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Title page for ETD etd-12012006-110902


Type of Document Dissertation
Author Kuryla, Peter Andrew
Author's Email Address peter.a.kuryla@vanderbilt.edu
URN etd-12012006-110902
Title The Integration of the American Mind: Intellectuals and the Creation of the Civil Rights Movement, 1944-1983
Degree PhD
Department History
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Dennis C. Dickerson Committee Chair
Dennis C. Dickerson Committee Chair
Devin Fergus Committee Member
Devin Fergus Committee Member
Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr. Committee Member
Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr. Committee Member
Richard H. King Committee Member
Richard H. King Committee Member
Thomas Schwartz Committee Member
Thomas Schwartz Committee Member
Keywords
  • intellectuals
  • civil rights movement
  • ralph ellison
  • reinhold niebuhr
  • harold cruse
  • kenneth clark
  • daniel moynihan
  • nathan glazer
  • arthur m. schlesinger
  • jr.
  • intellectuals
  • civil rights movement
  • ralph ellison
  • reinhold niebuhr
  • harold cruse
  • kenneth clark
  • daniel moynihan
  • nathan glazer
  • arthur m. schlesinger
  • jr.
Date of Defense 2006-11-30
Availability unrestricted
Abstract
The civil rights movement was the most important intellectual transformation since the Second World War; in terms of domestic influence, possibly the most important since the Civil War. Still, people often disagree about what it meant, and rarely measure its impact in the same way. I argue that the movement should be considered as an idea, which means accounting for how the movement became so widely available for use and reference by so many people. I describe not only a few of the ideas that contributed directly to the movement as popularly conceived, but especially those reactions to and interpretations of the civil rights movement by intellectuals, as a concept or term in their competing and complementary narratives of American history, the sum of which today comprises a quintessentially American style of political and cultural activity. The movement, considered as a powerful new idea, changed the nature of political practice and public discourse in the United States, but also fused with and incorporated existing conceptions concerning the nature of, and prospects for, American democracy.
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