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Title page for ETD etd-07142014-170321


Type of Document Dissertation
Author Sutton, Angela Christine
URN etd-07142014-170321
Title Competition and the Mercantile Culture of the Gold Coast Slave Trade in the Atlantic World Economy, 1620-1720
Degree PhD
Department History
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Jane Landers Committee Chair
Catherine Molineux Committee Member
Richard Blackett Committee Member
Steven Wernke Committee Member
Keywords
  • Slave Traders
  • Women in Africa
  • Royal Africa Company
  • West India Company
  • Cape Three Points
  • Gross Friedrichsburg
  • Jan Conny
  • Anglo Dutch Wars
  • Komenda Wars
  • Atlantic West Africa
  • privateering
  • slave trade piracy
  • Swedish Slave Trade
  • Brandenburg Africa Company
  • Prussian Slave Trade
  • Caboceers
  • Elmina
  • St. Thomas
  • Dutch Brazil
  • Curacao
  • Atlantic Creoles
  • Eric Williams
  • Free Trade
  • fetish
Date of Defense 2014-04-09
Availability restricted
Abstract
This dissertation explores the roles Gold Coast Africans played in the various challenges to Dutch and English monopoly in the Atlantic slave trade from 1621 to 1720. Using a close reading and corroboration of archaic English, Dutch, Prussian, and Swedish documents of the trade, as well as interdisciplinary inclusion of archaeological evidence, I contextualize how West African peoples such as the Ahanta, Eguafu, and Fetu, pitted various European slave traders against one another in order to weaken the growing power of the English and Dutch in Africa. This made the area attractive to smaller trading partners, such as the Swedish and Prussian slave trading companies, as well as various European and American interlopers onto the trade. This African-initiated fragmentation of the trade created a new mercantile culture on the Gold Coast dependent upon personal relationships which contributed to the destruction of the mercantilist system and the rise of free trade capitalism in the early modern world.
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