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Title page for ETD etd-04302013-215902


Type of Document Dissertation
Author Lense, Miriam Diane
Author's Email Address miriam.lense@vanderbilt.edu
URN etd-04302013-215902
Title (A)musicality in Williams syndrome: Examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music
Degree PhD
Department Psychology
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Elisabeth Dykens Committee Chair
John Rieser Committee Member
Mark Wallace Committee Member
Paul Yoder Committee Member
Keywords
  • pitch perception
  • amusia
  • music
  • Williams syndrome
  • auditory sensitivity
Date of Defense 2013-04-12
Availability unrestricted
Abstract
Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder that has been of interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and typically developing individuals with and without amusia.
Files
  Filename       Size       Approximate Download Time (Hours:Minutes:Seconds) 
 
 28.8 Modem   56K Modem   ISDN (64 Kb)   ISDN (128 Kb)   Higher-speed Access 
  Lense.pdf 384.72 Kb 00:01:46 00:00:54 00:00:48 00:00:24 00:00:02

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